The End of Intravitreal Injections?

12 08 2012

Intravitreal injection of drugs is now the standard of care for treatment of many forms of diabetic macular edema and “wet” macular degeneration. The results after injection can be amazing, yet every time I inject a patient, I am acutely aware that there is a small risk of developing endophthalmitis with the injection – 1/1000 per injection. And as is often the case, the organisms causing infection with intravitreal injections often lead to loss of vision. It’s a small risk, but a very real one. I wish there were some way to deliver the drugs without having to inject them into the vitreous.

So, I was excited to read of the study by Patel et al from the Georgia Institute of Technology that was published in the July 2012 issue of Ophthalmology and Visual Science. They describe using a 750 micron needle to inject drugs into the suprachoroidal space (SCS) of rabbit eyes. This technique delivers drugs to the chorioretinal area, through the sclera, and avoids entering the vitreous cavity. Presumably, the risk of endophthalmitis would be greatly reduced, if not eliminated, with this technique.

750 micron needle used for suprachoroidal injections (Courtesy of Medscape)

The study showed that drug concentrations after such injections were higher in the posterior segment of the eye than the anterior segment, and that they stayed around longer than with intravitreal injections.

Of course, the efficacy of this technique would need to be proven in humans, and I look forward such studies. I’m thrilled that such work is being done as it could help reduce the main concern of intravitreal injection, endophthalmitis.

If you are Medscape member, you can read more about the study here.  Microneedle Developed for Back-of-the-Eye Injections





CATT Results Released: Avastin and Lucentis Equivalent for AMD

29 04 2011

Well, it’s the big news today. The one-year results of the NIH sponsored CATT trial, comparing Avastin (bevacizumab) and Lucentis (ranibizumab) in a head-to-head comparison for the treatment of AMD were released early. The results at one year show equal efficacy in terms of visual acuity. Interestingly, the study also show that prn dosing results in equal visual acuities when compared to monthly dosing.

Here are the key paragraphs from the NIH press release. The full article is available online at the NEJM site, if you have access to that site.

“NEI launched CATT in 2008 to compare Lucentis and Avastin for treatment of wet AMD. The study has now reported results for 1,185 patients treated at 43 clinical centers in the United States. Patients were randomly assigned and treated with one of four regimens for a year. They received Lucentis monthly or PRN, or Avastin monthly or PRN. Enrollment criteria required that study participants had active disease.

“Patients in the monthly dosing groups received an initial treatment and then had an injection every 28 days. Patients in the PRN groups received an initial treatment and were then examined every 28 days to determine medical need for additional treatment. PRN groups received subsequent treatment when there were signs of disease activity, such as fluid in the retina. Ophthalmologists involved in patient care did not know which study drug a patient was getting, to make sure that the data was not affected by how anyone felt about the treatment.

“Change in visual acuity served as the primary outcome measure for CATT. Thus far, visual acuity improvement was virtually identical (within one letter difference on an eye chart) for either drug when given monthly. In addition, no difference was found in the percentage of patients who had an important gain or loss in visual function. Also, when each drug was given on a PRN schedule, there also was no difference (within one letter) between drugs. PRN dosing required four to five fewer injections per year than monthly treatment. Visual gains were about two letters less with PRN than with monthly treatment but overall visual results were still excellent.

“‘In addition to the primary finding of equivalence between Lucentis and Avastin for visual acuity, CATT also demonstrates that PRN dosing is a viable treatment option for either of these drugs,’ said Daniel F. Martin M.D., study chair for CATT and chairman of the Cole Eye Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. ‘Substantial visual acuity gains may be accomplished with a lower treatment burden.’

“Adverse events indicate development or worsening of a medical condition. They may or may not be causally associated with the clinical trial treatment, but they are always monitored and reported in any clinical trial. The median age of patients in CATT was over 80 years, and a high rate of hospitalizations might be anticipated as a result of chronic or acute medical conditions more common to older populations.

“Serious adverse events (primarily hospitalizations) occurred at a 24 percent rate for patients receiving Avastin and a 19 percent rate for patients receiving Lucentis. These events were distributed across many different conditions, most of which were not associated with Avastin in cancer clinical trials where the drug was administered at 500 times the dose used for AMD. The number of deaths, heart attacks, and strokes were low and similar for both drugs during the study. CATT was not capable of determining whether there is an association between a particular adverse event and treatment. Differences in serious adverse event rates require further study.

“Investigators in the CATT study will continue to follow patients through a second year of treatment. These additional data will provide information on longer-term effects of the drugs on vision and safety.





ANCHOR Study: Lucentis is better than Photodynamic Therapy for Classic ARMD

29 10 2009

Here’s the abstract for the two-year study results.  There are a few key points:  Ranibizumab patients maintained vision better (90%) vs. PDT patients (65%).  More ranibizumab patients gained vision (about 35-40%) than PDT patients (6%).  Injections were monthly.

Ophthalmology. 2009 Jan;116(1):57-65.e5.
Ranibizumab versus verteporfin photodynamic therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration: Two-year results of the ANCHOR study.
Brown DM, Michels M, Kaiser PK, Heier JS, Sy JP, Ianchulev T; ANCHOR Study Group.

Collaborators (87)
Vitreoretinal Consultants, Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. dmbmd@houstonretina.com
Comment in:

Ophthalmology. 2009 Aug;116(8):1593.
OBJECTIVE: The 2-year, phase III trial designated Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) Antibody for the Treatment of Predominantly Classic Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV) in Age-related Macular Degeneration (ANCHOR) compared ranibizumab with verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating predominantly classic CNV. DESIGN: Multicenter, international, randomized, double-masked, active-treatment-controlled clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with predominantly classic, subfoveal CNV not previously treated with PDT or antiangiogenic drugs.

INTERVENTION: Patients were randomized 1:1:1 to verteporfin PDT plus monthly sham intraocular injection or to sham verteporfin PDT plus monthly intravitreal ranibizumab (0.3 mg or 0.5 mg) injection. The need for PDT (active or sham) retreatment was evaluated every 3 months using fluorescein angiography (FA). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary, intent-to-treat efficacy analysis was at 12 months, with continued measurements to month 24. Key measures included the percentage losing <15 letters from baseline visual acuity (VA) score (month 12 primary efficacy outcome measure), percentage gaining >or=15 letters from baseline, and mean change over time in VA score and FA-assessed lesion characteristics. Adverse events were monitored.

RESULTS: Of 423 patients (143 PDT, 140 each in the 2 ranibizumab groups), the majority (>or=77% in each group) completed the 2-year study. Consistent with results at month 12, at month 24 the VA benefit from ranibizumab was statistically significant (P<0.0001 vs. PDT) and clinically meaningful: 89.9% to 90.0% of ranibizumab-treated patients had lost <15 letters from baseline (vs. 65.7% of PDT patients); 34% to 41.0% had gained >or=15 letters (vs. 6.3% of PDT group); and, on average, VA was improved from baseline by 8.1 to 10.7 letters (vs. a mean decline of 9.8 letters in PDT group). Changes in lesion anatomic characteristics on FA also favored ranibizumab (all comparisons P<0.0001 vs. PDT). Overall, there was no imbalance among groups in rates of serious ocular and nonocular adverse events. In the pooled ranibizumab groups, 3 of 277 (1.1%) patients developed presumed endophthalmitis in the study eye (rate per injection = 3/5921 [0.05%]).

CONCLUSIONS: In this 2-year study, ranibizumab provided greater clinical benefit than verteporfin PDT in patients with age-related macular degeneration with new-onset, predominantly classic CNV. Rates of serious adverse events were low. FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE(S): Proprietary or commercial disclosure may be found after the references.